• THE SMITH

    THE SMITH

    In the lead up to Celebrating The Cure’s Greatest - performed by Steve Kilbey (The Church), Dave Challinor (Sounds Like Sunset), Ken Blonde (Mr Blonde) and a bevy of local guests – at Gate One Theatre on Saturday, July 22, we revisit Bob Gordon’s chat with the one-and-only Robert Smith. This interview was first published in X-Press Magazine on Thursday, September 28, 2000, with Part II running one week later... 
     

  • TICKETS TO RIDE

    TICKETS TO RIDE

    There’s several points along the way in Meal Tickets, Mat De Koning's documentary which follows the punk rock journey of the Screwtop Detonators, their inept-roadie-cum-aspiring-rock-star Will Stoker, lothario manager Dave Kavanagh and multiple others, where someone either off-camera or on, mutters something along the lines of, ‘oh, so you’ve brought your camera then, Mat?’

  • SMOKIN’ JOHNNY CRASH

    SMOKIN’ JOHNNY CRASH

    John Phatorous has been at this for decades. He has not wavered. His love of rock’n’roll speaks to the truest sense of that ‘Mission From God’ - meaningful and occasionally meaningless and both of equal importance.

    “Rock’n’roll is its own gift,” he says. “If you love it. Like many things in life.”

    Phatorous’ softly-spoken and gentle nature is belied by an onstage presence that says, assuredly, ‘We mean business here. And if you do not, then I mean enough business for the both of us’.

  • TOMMY'S ALRIGHT

    TOMMY'S ALRIGHT

    In early 2012 Roger Daltrey was set to bring his own concert experience of The Who’s iconic 1969 album (and 1975 movie) Tommy to Australia. It was ultimately cancelled for other plans, but not before Bob Gordon interviewed Daltrey in November, 2011, for The West Australian.

    Roger Daltrey well remembers The Who’s 1969 first public performance, in Dolton UK, of Tommy, Pete Townshend’s infamous rock opera about a messianic ‘deaf, dumb and blind kid’ who sure played a mean pinball.

  • DIAMONDS IN THE STREAM

    DIAMONDS IN THE STREAM

    Pete Murray is feeling the pressure. Not to see if his brand-new album, Camacho, can match the success of previous releases – four top 10 albums, three of them reaching number one - but simply to see if an album into which he has invested so much of his time and energy will find an audience. 

    And he doesn't just want an audience for 2017, he is hoping Camacho will be still be being played and enjoyed in 50 years.